"

If you’re poor, the only way you’re likely to injure someone is the old traditional way: artisanal violence, we could call it – by hands, by knife, by club, or maybe modern hands-on violence, by gun or by car.

But if you’re tremendously wealthy, you can practice industrial-scale violence without any manual labor on your own part. You can, say, build a sweatshop factory that will collapse in Bangladesh and kill more people than any hands-on mass murderer ever did, or you can calculate risk and benefit about putting poisons or unsafe machines into the world, as manufacturers do every day. If you’re the leader of a country, you can declare war and kill by the hundreds of thousands or millions. And the nuclear superpowers – the US and Russia – still hold the option of destroying quite a lot of life on Earth.

So do the carbon barons. But when we talk about violence, we almost always talk about violence from below, not above.

"
america-wakiewakie:

Those Kids Crossing the Border From Mexico Wouldn’t Be There If Obama Hadn’t Supported a Coup the Media Doesn’t Talk About | Common Dreams
If you’re reading this, you probably follow the news. So you’ve probably heard of the latest iteration of the “crisis at the border”: tens of thousands of children, many of them unaccompanied by an adult, crossing the desert from Mexico into the United States, where they surrender to the Border Patrol in hope of being allowed to remain here permanently. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s detention and hearing system has been overwhelmed by the surge of children and, in some cases, their parents. The Obama Administration has asked Congress to approve new funding to speed up processing and deportations of these illegal immigrants.
Even if you’ve followed this story closely, you probably haven’t heard the depressing backstory — the reason so many Central Americans are sending their children on a dangerous thousand-mile journey up the spine of Mexico, where they ride atop freight trains, endure shakedowns by corrupt police and face rapists, bandits and other predators. (For a sense of what it’s like, check out the excellent 2004 film “Maria Full of Grace.”)
NPR and other mainstream news outlets are parroting the White House, which blames unscrupulous “coyotes” (human smugglers) for “lying to parents, telling them that if they put their kids in the hands of traffickers and get to the United States that they will be able to stay.” True: the coyotes are saying that in order to gin up business. Also true: U.S. law has changed, and many of these kids have a strong legal case for asylum. Unfortunately, U.S. officials are ignoring the law.
The sad truth is that this “crisis at the border” is yet another example of “blowback.”
Blowback is an unintended negative consequence of U.S. political, military and/or economic intervention overseas — when something we did in the past comes back to bite us in the ass.9/11 is the classic example; arming and funding radical Islamists in the Middle East and South Asia who were less grateful for our help than angry at the U.S.’ simultaneous backing for oppressive governments (The House of Saud, Saddam, Assad, etc.) in the region.
More recent cases include U.S. support for Islamist insurgents in Libya and Syria, which destabilized both countries and led to the murders of U.S. consular officials in Benghazi, and the rise of ISIS, the guerilla army that imperils the U.S.-backed Maliki regime in Baghdad, respectively.
Confusing the issue for casual American news consumers is that the current border crisis doesn’t involve the usual Mexicans traveling north in search of work. Instead, we’re talking about people from Central American nations devastated by a century of American colonialism and imperialism, much of that intervention surprisingly recent. Central American refugees are merely transiting through Mexico.
"The unaccompanied children crossing the border into the United States are leaving behind mainly three Central American countries, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. The first two are among the world’s most violent and all three have deep poverty, according to a Pew Research report based on Department of Homeland Security (DHS) information,” reports NBC News. “El Salvador ranked second in terms of homicides in Latin America in 2011, and it is still high on the list. Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador are among the poorest nations in Latin America. Thirty percent of Hondurans, 17 percent of Salvadorans and 26 percent of Guatemalans live on less than $2 a day.”
The fact that Honduras is the biggest source of the exodus jumped out at me. That’s because, in 2009, the United States government — under President Obama — tacitly supported a military coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Honduras. “Washington has a very close relationship with the Honduran military, which goes back decades,” The Guardian noted at the time. “During the 1980s, the US used bases in Honduras to train and arm the Contras, Nicaraguan paramilitaries who became known for their atrocities in their war against the Sandinista government in neighbouring Nicaragua.”
Honduras wasn’t paradise under President Manuel Zelaya. Since the coup, however, the country has entered a downward death spiral of drug-related bloodshed and political revenge killings that crashed the economy, brought an end to law, order and civil society, and now has some analysts calling it a “failed state” along the lines of Somalia and Afghanistan during the 1990s.
"Zelaya’s overthrow created a vacuum in security in which military and police were now focused more on political protest, and also led to a freeze in international aid that markedly worsened socio-economic conditions," Mark Ungar, professor of political science at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York, told The International Business Times. “The 2009 coup, asserts [Tulane] professor Aaron Schneider, gave the Honduran military more political and economic leverage, at the same time as the state and political elites lost their legitimacy, resources and the capacity to govern large parts of the country.”
El Salvador and Guatemala, also narcostates devastated by decades of U.S. support for oppressive, corrupt right-wing dictatorships, are suffering similar conditions.
(Photo Credit: AP | Supporters of ousted Honduras’ President Manuel Zelaya clash with soldiers near the presidential residency Tegucigalpa, Monday, June 29. 2009. Police fired tear gas to hold back thousands of Hondurans outside the occupied presidential residency as world leaders appealed to Honduras to reverse a coup that ousted the president.)

america-wakiewakie:

Those Kids Crossing the Border From Mexico Wouldn’t Be There If Obama Hadn’t Supported a Coup the Media Doesn’t Talk About | Common Dreams

If you’re reading this, you probably follow the news. So you’ve probably heard of the latest iteration of the “crisis at the border”: tens of thousands of children, many of them unaccompanied by an adult, crossing the desert from Mexico into the United States, where they surrender to the Border Patrol in hope of being allowed to remain here permanently. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s detention and hearing system has been overwhelmed by the surge of children and, in some cases, their parents. The Obama Administration has asked Congress to approve new funding to speed up processing and deportations of these illegal immigrants.

Even if you’ve followed this story closely, you probably haven’t heard the depressing backstory — the reason so many Central Americans are sending their children on a dangerous thousand-mile journey up the spine of Mexico, where they ride atop freight trains, endure shakedowns by corrupt police and face rapists, bandits and other predators. (For a sense of what it’s like, check out the excellent 2004 film “Maria Full of Grace.”)

NPR and other mainstream news outlets are parroting the White House, which blames unscrupulous “coyotes” (human smugglers) for “lying to parents, telling them that if they put their kids in the hands of traffickers and get to the United States that they will be able to stay.” True: the coyotes are saying that in order to gin up business. Also true: U.S. law has changed, and many of these kids have a strong legal case for asylum. Unfortunately, U.S. officials are ignoring the law.

The sad truth is that this “crisis at the border” is yet another example of “blowback.”

Blowback is an unintended negative consequence of U.S. political, military and/or economic intervention overseas — when something we did in the past comes back to bite us in the ass.9/11 is the classic example; arming and funding radical Islamists in the Middle East and South Asia who were less grateful for our help than angry at the U.S.’ simultaneous backing for oppressive governments (The House of Saud, Saddam, Assad, etc.) in the region.

More recent cases include U.S. support for Islamist insurgents in Libya and Syria, which destabilized both countries and led to the murders of U.S. consular officials in Benghazi, and the rise of ISIS, the guerilla army that imperils the U.S.-backed Maliki regime in Baghdad, respectively.

Confusing the issue for casual American news consumers is that the current border crisis doesn’t involve the usual Mexicans traveling north in search of work. Instead, we’re talking about people from Central American nations devastated by a century of American colonialism and imperialism, much of that intervention surprisingly recent. Central American refugees are merely transiting through Mexico.

"The unaccompanied children crossing the border into the United States are leaving behind mainly three Central American countries, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. The first two are among the world’s most violent and all three have deep poverty, according to a Pew Research report based on Department of Homeland Security (DHS) information,” reports NBC News. “El Salvador ranked second in terms of homicides in Latin America in 2011, and it is still high on the list. Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador are among the poorest nations in Latin America. Thirty percent of Hondurans, 17 percent of Salvadorans and 26 percent of Guatemalans live on less than $2 a day.”

The fact that Honduras is the biggest source of the exodus jumped out at me. That’s because, in 2009, the United States government — under President Obama — tacitly supported a military coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Honduras. “Washington has a very close relationship with the Honduran military, which goes back decades,” The Guardian noted at the time. “During the 1980s, the US used bases in Honduras to train and arm the Contras, Nicaraguan paramilitaries who became known for their atrocities in their war against the Sandinista government in neighbouring Nicaragua.”

Honduras wasn’t paradise under President Manuel Zelaya. Since the coup, however, the country has entered a downward death spiral of drug-related bloodshed and political revenge killings that crashed the economy, brought an end to law, order and civil society, and now has some analysts calling it a “failed state” along the lines of Somalia and Afghanistan during the 1990s.

"Zelaya’s overthrow created a vacuum in security in which military and police were now focused more on political protest, and also led to a freeze in international aid that markedly worsened socio-economic conditions," Mark Ungar, professor of political science at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York, told The International Business Times. “The 2009 coup, asserts [Tulane] professor Aaron Schneider, gave the Honduran military more political and economic leverage, at the same time as the state and political elites lost their legitimacy, resources and the capacity to govern large parts of the country.”

El Salvador and Guatemala, also narcostates devastated by decades of U.S. support for oppressive, corrupt right-wing dictatorships, are suffering similar conditions.

(Photo Credit: AP | Supporters of ousted Honduras’ President Manuel Zelaya clash with soldiers near the presidential residency Tegucigalpa, Monday, June 29. 2009. Police fired tear gas to hold back thousands of Hondurans outside the occupied presidential residency as world leaders appealed to Honduras to reverse a coup that ousted the president.)

(via blackyearlings)

"

“We’re all the same inside” minimizes the oppression LGBTQ people have faced and continue to face because of cisheterosexist society insisting that everyone ought to be “the same.” Many LGBTQ people have faced abusive reparative therapy at the hands of people who want everyone to be “the same.” It also others those LGBTQ folks who are aren’t content with assimilation—who want more than just the right to marry and be seen as “normal.”

I want my differences as a queer person to be liberated and affirmed, not erased. Not dismissed with “We are all the same inside.”
The main thing I want to talk about in this post, though, is my experience as former employee of Burger King, and how it shapes my reactions to hearing about the Proud Whopper. Burger King may be using the Proud Whopper to exploit the LGBTQ movement in order to make a buck or two, but this is nothing new for them. In fact, Burger King has been exploiting LGBTQ bodies for years.

You see, one place where we are definitely not “all the same” is inside of our wallets. LGBTQ people (especially if they are trans women and/or people of color) are disproportionately affected by poverty because of the various, overlapping oppressions they face.
How much do you think Burger King pays the queer people who work for them?

I’ll tell you how much I got paid when I worked there: $7.25 per hour. Minimum wage laws vary from state to state, but I can tell you that most Burger Kings are paying their workers as little as legally possible.

I’ll also tell you this—unless a Burger King is in a state where the law states otherwise, they can legally pay employees under the age of 20 what is called a “federal training wage.” This can be as low as $4.25. Though I personally do not know anyone who was getting paid that little, I did have an 18 year old coworker, working to care for her family, who was making only $7.00.
That’s even less than the federal minimum wage. Minimum wage is abysmal enough, and some Burger Kings won’t even pay their employees that.

Do you know how many teenage LGBTQ people are homeless because of rejection or abuse from their families? And here Burger King is paying some of these kids less than minimum wage, and still trying to convince us they care about LGBTQ communities.
What will the Proud Whopper do for Burger King’s LGBTQ employees? Will it help the gay couple who met while working in the kitchen together afford their wedding? What will it do for the queer college student who can’t come out of the closet because hir parents—who help hir with the school bill that ze can’t afford on only her BK salary—would cut hir off? How about the trans woman who works front counter? Will she be able to afford hormones now, even though Burger King won’t give her enough hours to qualify for health insurance?

If Burger King really cared about LGBTQ communities, if they really wanted to make a difference in the lives of LGBTQ people, they would pay their employees a livable wage.

They would pay the people who wrap their sandwiches in rainbows, sweep rainbows off the floor, unclog the rainbows that some jokester tried to flush down the toilet.

The people who stand for 8 hours straight or more, sometimes with no break, because rainbow Whoppers need to be made.

The people who have to run to the back of the store and strain their back to retrieve a new box of rainbows when they run out up front.
The people who get yelled and cursed at and called “faggot” or other slurs when rainbows don’t get to customers in time.

Until those employees are making a livable wage, I don’t think I can see The Proud Whopper as anything more than an attempt for Burger King to exploit LGBTQ people even more than they already do.
Keep your rainbows, Burger King. I don’t trust you with my liberation.

"
Trans and Queer Activists Beaten and Arrested During SF Pride    →

thatweirdo-intheduckieshirt:

[TW: POLICE BRUTALITY, TRANSMISOGYNY, RACISM]

Trans and Queer Activists Beaten and Arrested During SF Pride

San Francisco’s Mission District – At least six people were arrested on Saturday night after a protest against a prison-themed Kink.com party.

The six included a National Lawyers’ Guild Legal Observer; several protesters were clubbed and beaten to the ground after a protest numbering several hundred marched to the Armory at 14thand Mission Streets in the Mission District, from a 10 p.m. gathering at the 16th Street BART Station. Two of the arrestees have been released; four are still in custody as of 4 a.m. Sunday morning.

The promoters of the Kink.com party mockingly invited people to “get arrested” and enjoy “solitary confinement, showers, jailbreak, love and lust, freedom and confinement.” The protesters argued that the party was a crude event that profited off of the brutality suffered by trans women and gender nonconforming people of color, who are so often funneled into the prison industrial complex.

"This is a travesty—on the anniversary of the famed Stonewall Rebellion, where trans and queer people rose up against police brutality, that six people would be arrested for protesting an SF Pride-sanctioned party that celebrated state violence and prison rape," said Mary Lou Ratchet, a Gay Shame (gayshamesf.org) representative. The march was organized by Gay Shame and LAGAI (www.lagai.org).

A coalition of community groups and members of the gay community, including Pride Grand Marshals, had already signed on to a petition condemning the event:http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/ 51040/p/dia/action3/common/ public/?action_KEY=14295

take action:

Please join us in continuing and advancing the struggle for liberation from the prision industrial complex by calling in to the SF DA’s office to demand that the charges against Rebecca, Prisca, and Sarai are dropped.

Please call in to either
(415) 553-1751
(415) 553-1754

basic ask:

"We demand that the DA’s office Drop the Charges against Rebecca Luisa Ruiz-Lichter, Prisca Carpenter, Sarai Robles-Mendez."

Please feel free to add any additional comments and spread the word.

(via punwitch)

newwavefeminism:

toastyslayingbutter:

dynastylnoire:

siddharthasmama:

nezua:

Never forget the foundation of Law and Order.

People really don’t know that America’s first police force was made to keep watch for runaway slaves and keep free ones in check. This has carried over into today and will never stop, unfortunately.

KRS One tried to tell us

The first police “organizations” were Rattle Watches. The first police officers were Runaway Slave Patrolman, which started in 1705.

Historical context is significant

newwavefeminism:

toastyslayingbutter:

dynastylnoire:

siddharthasmama:

nezua:

Never forget the foundation of Law and Order.

People really don’t know that America’s first police force was made to keep watch for runaway slaves and keep free ones in check. This has carried over into today and will never stop, unfortunately.

KRS One tried to tell us

The first police “organizations” were Rattle Watches. The first police officers were Runaway Slave Patrolman, which started in 1705.

Historical context is significant

(via cruiserswagger)

thepeoplesrecord:

Apartheid in Detroit: Water for corporations, not people
June 18, 2014

Biill and Hillary Clinton were up to their ears in more than $10 million worth of legal debt at the end of Clinton’s tenure as president. Donald Trump was bailed out of four bankruptcies. But Detroit residents are having a basic human right – the access to water – cancelled for being late on bills of $150.

In the spring, Detroit’s Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr ordered water shutoffs for 150,000 Detroit residents late on their bills. Orr is an unelected bureaucrat accountable only to Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, who appointed Orr and several other “emergency managers” in largely poor, black communities like Detroit, Benton Harbor, Flint, and Highland Park, to make all financial decisions on behalf of local elected governments.

Orr’s plan will shut off water for 1,500 to 3,000 Detroit residents each week. Neither Orr nor Homrich, the contracting company Orr hired to shut off residents’ water, answered calls for interview requests.

Detroit citizens have been protesting the decision on the basis that water is a human right that cannot be denied to families who need it for cooking, bathing and flushing toilets. Many residents facing water shutoffs are currently on monthly payment plans with the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD), paying upwards of $160 per month as water rates continue to rise, and were given no prior notice that their water was about to be cut off. Last week, the Detroit City Council held a public hearing to discuss a proposed 4 percent hike in water rates.

“The families I’ve talked to in my neighborhood and others around the city are confused about why they’re being hit (in this way),” community activist Russ Bellant told the Michigan Citizen. “Some knew they were behind, but thought they’d have time to pay it. These are people who mow the lawn on the vacant lots next door (to them).”

As the Michigan Citizen reported, residents with delinquent water bills are losing their water while prominent Detroit corporations with much larger delinquent water bills are being left alone. The Palmer Park Golf Club owes $200,000. Joe Louis Arena, home of the Detroit Red Wings, owes DWSD $80,000. Ford Field owes $55,000. Kevyn Orr is arguing that the shutoffs are necessary to pay for the DWSD infrastructure – yet when Detroit raised $1 billion in bonds to pay for new infrastructure, $537 million of it went to banks like JPMorgan Chase, UBS and Morgan Stanley to pay off interest instead.

Community activists are placing blame on the structural, institutionalized poverty in Detroit that forces the people to foot the bill for corporate mismanagement. Detroit’s bankruptcy and urban blight is a direct result of the housing bubble that burst, putting over 60,000 homes in foreclosure and rendering thousands of families homeless.

Dan Gilbert, the billionaire owner of Quicken Loans who is financing much of the gentrified development of downtown Detroit, has been particularly blamed for his company’s role in exacerbating the foreclosure crisis through its intimidation of homeowners, pressuring them into risky subprime lending schemes.

“Instead of going after the corporate institutions who owe millions, they’d rather turn off the water for poor people,” said Demeeko Williams, an organizer with Detroiters Resisting Emergency Management.

To fight back, Williams and other community activist groups like Moratorium NOW! and the Detroit After Party are teaming up to create theDetroit Water Brigade, a mutual aid effort aimed at providing residents with water and stopping water shutoffs with nonviolent direct action. The Detroit Water Brigade has set up a bridal registry on Amazon.com inviting those interested to help purchase necessary supplies like water coolers, cases of bottled water, heavy-duty contractor bags, and orange safety vests.

Some of the more radical direct actions being promoted by the Detroit Water Brigade include distributing flyers instructing people on how to turn their own water back on after it’s been shut off, and how to pre-emptively stop contractors from shutting water for their home. The flyer reads:

“Step 1: If your water is off, have the neighborhood water person or a friend (not you) obtain a water key and turn it back on 1st. (If you expect your water to be turned off, go to step 2.)

“Step 2: Purchase ready mix cement from the hardware [store].

“Step 3: Fill lockbox pipe 3/4ths full with dry cement mix.

“Step 4: Add water to top off. Don’t use rocks because rocks can be sucked out.”

The Detroit Water Brigade is also meeting regularly to train interested residents in nonviolent civil disobedience. Residents are planning to form human chains putting themselves between water lockboxes and contractors hired to shut off water. The water brigade is counting on Detroit’s understaffed police department to not have the resources to arrest and jail everyone participating in the water shutoff demonstrations.

In response to sustained protests from Detroit residents, the DWSD has removed the “Water Shut Off” decals from its trucks.

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

kropotkitten:

stunningpicture:

The internet changed the outernet. Removing the anti-homeless spikes

I think it was radical Black and Asian socialists using direct action in their neighborhoods/cities that changed this. 
London Black Revolutionaries claim responsibility for pouring concrete on anti-homeless spikes
Don’t let the media hide the fact that this was direct action by the dispossessed (in this case working class Black and Asian, mainly immigrants, people in England) fighting for other dispossessed people.

kropotkitten:

stunningpicture:

The internet changed the outernet. Removing the anti-homeless spikes

I think it was radical Black and Asian socialists using direct action in their neighborhoods/cities that changed this. 

London Black Revolutionaries claim responsibility for pouring concrete on anti-homeless spikes

Don’t let the media hide the fact that this was direct action by the dispossessed (in this case working class Black and Asian, mainly immigrants, people in England) fighting for other dispossessed people.

(via wispus)

dooglesforoogles:

anarcho-queer:

Albuquerque Police Department Substations Vandalized Overnight

Four Albuquerque Police Department substations across the city were vandalized with red paint Monday night.

The substations at Central and Rio Grande by Old Town, Central and Girard near the University of New Mexico, Montgomery and Tramway in the foothills and one on South Broadway were all painted overnight, according to an APD news release.

The defacement is most likely in retaliation to the recent shooting of James Boyd, a homeless man who was fatally shot after a three hour-long confrontation with police over illegal camping.

Residents have held several protests against police violence by Albuquerque police since the shooting last month.

In a highly scathing assessment, the Justice Department said Thursday that the Albuquerque Police Department, whose officers have shot a and killed 23 people in the past four years, had engaged in a “pattern or practice of use of excessive force,” often acting recklessly and violating people’s constitutional rights.

Yes!!!!

(via sunfishfiesta)

"A memorial erected in Vancouver sparked controversy because it was dedicated to “all women murdered by men”, which critics say implies all men are potential murderers.[79] As a result, women involved in the project received death threats[…]."

wikipedia page for the École Polytechnique massacre

men are violent against women, and when women point this out, they are threatened with more violence

(via fawnbro)

(via hustledrones)

rambleonamazon:

interpretivescreaming:

gayflames:

Report-back and photos from the march on Albany (March 14, 1971) for the loosening of laws against homosexuality and “impersonation.” Photos include Queens Liberation Front and Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries.

There’s a “trans critical” book coming out next year that is premised on the gaslighting proposal that the trans rights movement started in the 90’s. Keep our history safe, ya’ll. There are those who would take it from us.

Another noteworthy moment in modern trans history.

And as a reminder, the word “transvestite” had very different meanings at different points in the past 100+ years, and for a large portion of the past century there hasn’t been a strong dividing line between cross dressers, fetishists, drag queens, and trans women. It’s a good object lesson on how quickly language can evolve, especially within a culture so young and still finding its feet (or at least re-discovering itself, as in the case of trans women. Which is why I prefer to give people the benefit of the doubt on linguistic missteps.

(via punwitch)